Maurizio Lazzarato

Maurizio Lazzarato is a sociologist and philosopher living and working in Paris, where he studies immaterial labor, the breakdown of the wage system, and “post-socialist” movements. He is the author of The Making of the Indebted Man and Signs and Machines, both published by Semiotext(e).

Capital Hates Everyone
Fascism or Revolution

By Maurizio Lazzarato
Translated by Robert Hurley

We are living in apocalyptic times. In Capital Hates Everyone, famed sociologist Maurice Lazzarato points to a stark choice emerging from the magma of today’s world events: fascism or revolution. Fascism now drives the course of democracies as they grow less and less liberal and increasingly subject to the law of capital. Since the 1970s, Lazzarato writes, capital has entered a logic of war. It has become, by the power conferred on it by financialization, a political force intent on destruction. Lazzarato urges us to reject the illusory consolations a technology-abetted “new” kind of capitalism and choose revolution over fascism.

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Wars and Capital

By Éric Alliez and Maurizio Lazzarato
Translated by Ames Hodges

A critique of capital through the lens of war, and a critique of war through the lens of the revolution of 1968.

“We are at war,” declared the President of the French Republic on the evening of November 13, 2015. But what is this war, exactly?

In Wars and Capital, Éric Alliez and Maurizio Lazzarato propose a counter-history of capitalism to recover the reality of the wars that are inflicted on us and denied to us. We experience not the ideal war of philosophers, but wars of class, race, sex, and gender; wars of civilization and the environment; wars of subjectivity that are raging within populations and that constitute the secret motor of liberal governmentality. By naming the enemy (refugees, migrants, Muslims), the new fascisms establish their hegemony on the processes of political subjectivation by reducing them to racist, sexist, and xenophobic slogans, fanning the flames of war among the poor and maintaining the total war philosophy of neoliberalism.

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0-Maurizio-Lazzarato-Marcel-DuchampMarcel Duchamp
and The Refusal of (Artistic) Work

By Maurizio Lazzarato
Translated by Joshua David Jordan

Duchamp was among the first to understand that in Control Societies, whose structures began to appear in art well before they did elsewhere, art as an insti- tution, art “in the social sense of the word,” as Duchamp defined it, offers no promise of emanci- pation, but instead represents a new technique for governing subjectivity. Art is “a habit-forming drug. It’s a sedative drug.”

Published on the occasion of the 2014 Whitney Biennial

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9781584351634_0Governing by Debt

By Maurizio Lazzarato
Translated by Joshua David Jordan

Experts, pundits, and politicians agree: public debt is hindering growth and increasing unemployment. Governments must reduce debt at all cost if they want to restore confidence and get back on a path to prosperity. Maurizio Lazzarato’s diagnosis, however, is completely different: under capitalism, debt is not primarily a question of budget and economic concerns but a political relation of subjection and enslavement.

In Governing by Debt, Lazzarato confronts a wide range of thinkers—from Félix Guattari and Michel Foucault to David Graeber and Carl Schmitt—and draws on examples from the United States and Europe to argue that it is time that we unite in a collective refusal of this most dire status quo.

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signsandmachines

Signs and Machines
Capitalism and the Production of Subjectivity

By Maurizio Lazzarato
Translated by Joshua David Jordan

“Capital is a semiotic operator”: this assertion by Félix Guattari is at the heart of Maurizio Lazzarato’s Signs and Machines, which asks us to leave behind the logocentrism that still informs so many critical theories. Lazzarato calls instead for a new theory capable of explaining how signs function in the economy, in power apparatuses, and in the production of subjectivity.

Moving beyond the dualism of signifier and signified, Signs and Machines shows how signs act as “sign-operators” that enter directly into material flows and into the functioning of machines. Money, the stock market, price differentials, algorithms, and scientific equations and formulas constitute semiotic “motors” that make capitalism’s social and technical machines run, bypassing representation and consciousness to produce social subjections and semiotic enslavements.

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The Making of the Indebted Man
Essay on the Neoliberal Condition

By Maurizio Lazzarato
Translated by Joshua David Jordan

The debtor-creditor relation, which is at the heart of this book, sharpens mechanisms of exploitation and domination indiscriminately, since, in it, there is no distinction between workers and the unemployed, consumers and producers, working and non-working populations, between retirees and welfare recipients. They are all “debtors,” guilty and responsible in the eyes of capital, which has become the Great, the Universal, Creditor.–from The Making of the Indebted Man

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