Natash Stagg

Natasha Stagg is a senior editor at the fashion magazines V and VMAN. She has received a Hopwood Award for nonfiction and the Roy W. Cowden Memorial Fellowship and the James H. Robertson Award for fiction. Her essays have appeared in Dis magazine, Dazed, Kaleidoscope, Riot of Perfume, Sex, The Brooklyn Rail, and Bomb. She lives in Brooklyn.

Sleeveless

Fashion, Image, Media, New York 2011–2019
By Natasha Stagg

We were supposed to meet Rose McGowan at Café d’Alsace after the party, but she cancelled at the last minute. I saw on Twitter that she had been hit with a drug possession charge, which she insisted was a scheme to keep her Weinstein dirt quiet. I hadn’t even read her Weinstein story… I still wanted to know that the articles were being published, and in large quantities, but reading stories of abuse and humiliation was as stupefying as a hangover. I didn’t feel empowered; I only felt more hopeless. I wanted to watch the patriarchy go up in flames, but I wasn’t excited about what was being pitched to replace it. If we got all of it out in the open, what would we have left? My fear was that guilt would destroy the classics and there’d be no one left to fuck. All movies would be as low-budget and as puritanical as the stuff they play on Lifetime, all of New York would look like a Target ad, every book or article would be a cathartic tell-all, and I’d be sexually frustrated but too ashamed to hook up with assholes, or even to watch porn.—from Sleeveless 

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Natasha Stagg

Wryly mirroring the classic, female coming-of-age narrative, Natasha Stagg’s debut traces a few months in the life of Colleen, a twenty-three-year-old woman with almost no attachments or aspirations for her life. Working at an unsatisfying mall job in Tucson, Colleen sleepwalks through depressing office politics and tiresome one-night stands in a desultory way, becoming fully alive only at night when she’s online. Colleen attains ambiguous Internet stardom when she’s discovered by Jim, a semi-famous icon of masculinity and reclusiveness.